littleBits Night Light Hall of Fame Starter Kit

SKU: 680-0016

Experiment with light and design by creating your own friendly light to brighten even the darkest night.

  • 4 bits and 6 accessories
  • Ages 8+

SpheroCare Warranty
1 year: $6.99
2 year: $8.99
3 year: $11.99

 

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Price:
$39.99
Boy playing with night light invention.

Meet the Kit

With the Night Light Hall of Fame Kit, kids can create their own friendly light to brighten even the darkest night. The bargraph Bit, made of 5 multicolored LED lights, is sound-activated to work whenever kids are awake before bed or in stirring in the middle of the night. Little Edisons experimenting with light can then remix the invention and use the Bits in the kit to create a Megablaster wrist cuff, the invention that blasts imaginary powers wherever it’s aimed. The slide dimmer Bit lets kids control just how much of their superpower of light gets sent into the universe. Bits, accessories, and instructions included.

What's in the Box

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